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movie-night-event-2015

FOGH MEMBERS ONLY EVENT

SUMMER MOVIE NIGHT
Saturday, August 1, 2015

THE ILLUSIONIST
The Illusionist (2006) is a period drama written and directed by Neil Burger and starring Edward Norton, Paul Giamatti, and Jessica Biel. The film is based loosely on Steven Millhauser’s short story, “Eisenheim the Illusionist”. The film tells the story of a Viennese magician, Eisenheim, who reunites with his childhood love, a woman far above his social standing.

Movie starts at dusk (Please, no arrival prior to 6:00pm) so bring a blanket, dinner, and bottle of wine and share in the pre-movie fun. As usual, we’ll have popcorn, candy, snow cones and we’ll also be raffling off some great prizes. Hope to see you there!

Some Notes About The Event:
• No tickets or reservations are needed. This is a members only event however members are welcome to bring guests. We love to meet new friends.

• Guests bringing chairs or loungers will be directed toward the side or back lawn area to allow unobstructed viewing.

• Restrooms will be available and remain open throughout the event.

• Unfortunately we can not accommodate seating on The Gamble House terrace during the movie.


embroidery-event

In Conjunction with the Upstairs/Downstairs Tours

EMBROIDERING IN ARCHITECTURE WITH JENNY HART
Saturday, August 8, 2015 • Workshop duration 9-11:30am

Especially conceived for “Upstairs Downstairs”, participants will embroider a small (and easy-to-stitch) portrait of one of the Gamble House’s most beloved former staff members while gathered on Aunt Julia’s sleeping porch.

No embroidery experience is necessary. Hart will teach the basics of embroidery.

All materials provided for each participant to use and keep: Original Design on Fabric • Embroidery Hoop • Needles • Floss • Scissors • How-To Instructions • Additional Patterns

$120 per person
Seating limited to 20 students
BUY-with-acme-ticketing-logo-204x41

 

“Embroidery in the United States is unexpectedly in revival due in large part to the efforts of Jenny Hart.” ~ Nicolas R. Bell, Curator of American Craft and Decorative Art, Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Artist, author and embroidery designer Jenny Hart originated a series of site-specific workshops called “Embroidering in Architecture” in 2013. Held in locations of architectural beauty and significance, participants learn introductory techniques of hand embroidery while enjoying the rare opportunity to spend time in an inspiring environment.

Hart provides each student with a pre-printed composition on fabric, inspired by architectural hallmarks or history of the site, for each student to keep.   

Hart previously participated in the Machine Project’s Field Guide to L.A. Architecture with workshops at the Gamble House and the Neutra VDL house.

Jenny Hart was born in 1972 in Iowa City and raised in rural Illinois. She is best known for her artwork in hand embroidery and her design and supply company Sublime Stitching. Hart’s work has been published in numerous books and magazines including Vogue, Nylon, Spin, Real Simple, Juxtapoz, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post Magazine and others. Her work has appeared in nationally televised commercials, rock videos and television shows. She has exhibited in solo and group shows in Los Angeles, Paris, London and New York.

Hart is also an award-winning author of seven titles on embroidery for Chronicle Books, including Embroidered Effects. Jenny’s work is in multiple public and private collections of note, including the estate of Elizabeth Taylor and the permanent collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Jenny has lived in Kansas, France and Texas. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.


building-paradise

2015/2016 Sidney D. Gamble Lecture Series

BUILDING PARADISE IN CALIFORNIA
Monday, September 14, 2015

at the Neighborhood Church (Sanctuary)
301 N Orange Grove Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91103

Lecture & Presentation by Alex Vertikoff: 7:00-8:00pm
Panel discussion with Edward R. Bosley, Dr. Robert Winter, Ann Scheid, Anne Mallek: 8:00-8:30pm
Book signing and reception at the Gamble House: 8:45-9:30pm

Members: $25  |  Non-Members: $30
TICKETS AVAILABLE SOON!

For more than a century the Gamble House has stood on a promontory overlooking the Arroyo Seco, a thin riverbed that meanders down from the San Gabriel Mountains through Pasadena, California. For much of that time the house has been open to the public. More than a million visitors have toured the house since it became an architectural site in 1966. They come for a variety of reasons, but primarily to appreciate the uncommon mixture of art and craft that is the hallmark of architects Charles and Henry Greene. That they have arrived in such numbers for so long is a testament to the vision of the designers, the skill of their craftsmen-builders, and the fruitful connection they had with their clients.

Until now, little attention has been paid to the role that David and Mary Gamble played in creating their winter home and garden in collaboration with architects Greene & Greene. In this book, enriched by new scholarship and photographs, we hope to address essential questions about patronage and the transformative power of architecture.

“In the hands of lesser architects, a commission to create a seasonal residence in Pasadena for a wealthy midwestern family could easily have resulted in a grand but uninspired pile, as so often happened. Discerning clients certainly had excellent local choices, including classically trained architects Myron Hunt, Sylvanus Marston, and Frederick Roherig. Another pair of brothers, Alfred and Arthur Heinemann, had also begun to create houses of considerable distinction by the time the Gambles were planning to build. Exactly what compelled the Gambles to choose Charles and Henry Greene (there is no record of their looking at other candidates) may always remain a matter of informed speculation.

New evidence, however, gleaned from the Sarah Merry Bradley Gamble archives, shows the family to be the kind of sensitive and engaged collaborators and patrons that would be attracted to the Greenes. The happy outcome is a residence universally conceded to be an iconic landmark of twentieth-century architecture—a house that provided an inspirational living environment for two generations of Gambles and has since captured the imagination of countless visitors who come to appreciate architecture as fine art.”

Excerpt from The Gamble House: Building Paradise in California (page 62)
Essay entitled The Gamble House: Architecture as a Fine Art by Edward R. Bosley

Speaker Bios:
EDWARD R. BOSLEY is the James N. Gamble Director of The Gamble House, a program of the University of Southern California School of Architecture. For more than forty years he has studied, researched, lectured, and written on the work of architects Greene & Greene. He is author of the monograph Greene & Greene, published by Phaidon Press in 2000. With Anne E. Mallek he was co-curator of the exhibition A ‘New and Native’ Beauty: The Art and Craft of Greene & Greene and co-editor of the publication that accompanied the exhibit.

ANNE E. MALLEK has served as curator at the Gamble House since 2004. She previously worked at historic house museums in England and catalogued the extensive collection of William Morris and Morris & Company material at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. In 2008 she was co-curator with Edward R. Bosley of the traveling exhibition A ’New and Native’ Beauty: The Art and Craft of Greene & Greene and co-editor of the publication of the same name (Merrell Publishers). Mallek is a graduate of Lincoln College, Oxford, and the Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

ANN SCHEID heads the Greene & Greene Archives at the Huntington Library. The archives is administered by the Gamble House, University of Southern California. She is an author and historian who has published books on Pasadena history as well as articles and essays on the history of architecture, planning, and landscape in Southern California. She is a graduate of Vassar College, the University of Chicago, and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. She contributed a chapter on the clients of Greene & Greene to the publication A ’New and Native’ Beauty: The Art and Craft of Greene & Greene.

ROBERT WINTER is the author or co-author of nine books about California architecture. He is the Arthur G. Coons Professor of the History of Ideas, Emeritus, at Occidental College, Los Angeles, and a fellow of the Society of Architectural Historians. He lives in the historic Batchelder Bungalow in Pasadena, California.

ALEXANDER VERTIKOFF has served as the principal photographer for more than ten books on architecture, including American Bungalow Style; Greene & Greene: Masterworks; Greene & Greene: Developing a California Architecture; Stickley Style: Arts and Crafts Homes in the Craftsman Style; Bungalow Nation, and Edgar Miller and the Handmade Home: Chicago’s Forgotten Renaissance Man.

Photo courtesy of Alex Vertikoff


building-paradise

2015/2016 Sidney D. Gamble Lecture Series

PROPHETS WITHOUT HONOR:
THE REDISCOVERY OF GREENE & GREENE

Tuesday, February 23, 2016 • 7:00pm

at the Neighborhood Church (Chapel)
301 N Orange Grove Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91103

Members: $25  |  Non-Members: $30
TICKETS AVAILABLE SOON!

The first re-discovery of Greene & Greene and Arts & Crafts after WWII. There are several journalists, photographers, and others recognizing, via miscellaneous publications, the Greene brothers, and other Arts & Crafts practitioners. This re-discovery predates, by a few decades, the c.1972 which is generally recognized as the rebirth of Arts & Crafts in the United States. Photographs will accompany the talk.

Speaker Bios:
ANN SCHEID heads the Greene & Greene Archives at the Huntington Library. The archives is administered by the Gamble House, University of Southern California. She is an author and historian who has published books on Pasadena history as well as articles and essays on the history of architecture, planning, and landscape in Southern California. She is a graduate of Vassar College, the University of Chicago, and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. She contributed a chapter on the clients of Greene & Greene to the publication A ’New and Native’ Beauty: The Art and Craft of Greene & Greene.

Photo courtesy of Alex Vertikoff


Centennial-of-San-Francisco's-World's-Fair

2015/2016 Sidney D. Gamble Lecture Series

CALIFORNIA’S 1915 WORLD’S FAIRS: CREATING SAN DIEGO’S GARDEN FAIR AND SAN FRANCISCO’S JEWEL CITY
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 • 7:00pm

at the Neighborhood Church (Chapel)
301 N Orange Grove Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91103

Members: $25  |  Non-Members: $30
TICKETS AVAILABLE SOON!

The 1915 Centennial of San Francisco’s World’s Fair that celebrated the opening of the Panama Canal and the city’s reconstruction after the great earthquake of 1906.

The Panama–California Exposition was an exposition held in San Diego, California, between January 1, 1915, and January 1, 1917. The exposition celebrated the opening of the Panama Canal, and was meant to tout San Diego as the first U.S. port of call for ships traveling north after passing westward through the canal. The fair was held in San Diego’s large urban Balboa Park.

Speaker Bios:
VICTORIA KASTNER, Hearst Castle’s historian, has written and lectured about San Simeon’s land and buildings for nearly thirty years. She has master’s degrees from the University of California at Santa Barbara and George Washington University. She lives in Los Osos, California.


Pennsylvania-School-of-Horticulture-for-Women

2015/2016 Sidney D. Gamble Lecture Series

FROM BLOOMS TO BLOOMERS:
SCHOOLS FOR LADY GARDENERS

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 • 7:00pm

at the Neighborhood Church (Chapel)
301 N Orange Grove Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91103

Members: $25  |  Non-Members: $30
TICKETS AVAILABLE SOON!

A small but significant number of schools during the Progressive Era sought to educate women and girls to earn a livelihood in horticulture. They were international in context, often privately funded, and typically established by women in leadership positions. Although there were many such institutions throughout Europe, most closed before or after World war II. However, one school, the Pennsylvania School of Horticulture for Women, founded by Jane Bowne Haines in 1910 was an astounding success and had a longevity that led to its incorporation into Temple University in 1958. Well illustrated with period photography this lecture opens a window on a women’s movement little recognized today.

Speaker Bios:
VALENCIA LIBBY is a landscape historian and museum educator living in Down East, Maine. She was formerly an Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture & Horticulture at Temple University in Philadelphia and the recipient of the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Landscape History to Portugal in 2004. She currently serves as an advisor to numerous historical collections in Maine and the Beatrix Farrand Society’s Garland Farm.


View a list of past Gamble House events